Halakhah Intensive

Immersive Program
 | 
In Person
Date
-
Location
Cost
$300-$650

Hadar’s Halakhah Intensive features a week of rich, rigorous, and meaningful learning on a halakhic theme.

This program requires prior experience with learning halakhic texts, and it will be tracked by level, from intermediate to advanced. The brief application form includes a skills assessment to place participants in the appropriate level for their skills and background.

  • The advanced level is designed for those with fluency in Talmud and rishonim and who have extensive yeshiva background.
  • The intermediate level is designed for those who have spent time in a beit midrash and feel confident working through a sugya independently.

This year's theme is coming soon!

The schedule for 2025 is still in formation but you can explore last year's schedule below for an idea of the flow of the week:

5:30 PM - 5:45 PM

Arrive and Schmooze

5:45 PM - 7:00 PM

Welcome and Orientation
Minha

7:00 PM - 7:45 PM

Dinner

7:45 PM - 8:45 PM

Opening Lecture
“No Doubt About It:” Hazal’s approach to navigating uncertainty
R. Miriam-Simma Walfish
Doubt and uncertainty are a hallmark of the human condition. This lecture will frame our learning for the week by introducing key responses that the rabbis of the Mishnah and Talmud had to these common states. 

8:45 PM - 9:00 PM

Arvit

7:45 AM - 8:30 AM

Shaharit

8:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Breakfast

9:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Daily Orientation

9:15 AM - 12:45 PM

Seder and Shiur
Now you see it, now you don’t: Doubtful Objects in Hazal

We will begin our exploration of s’feik s’feika by looking at two cases in the Talmud in which a prohibited object is mixed with permitted objects. Debate over how to relate to this mixture of objects led to the development of the concept of s’feik s’feika

12:45 PM - 1:45 PM

Lunch

1:45 PM - 2:10 PM

Minhah

2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Shiur Klali
Confronting Gender in Core Paradigms of Safek
R. Aviva Richman

One of the paradigmatic cases in the classical canon of assessing S’feik S’feika relates to a groom's concern about a bride's virginity.  We will study how the Talmud Yerushalmi and Talmud Bavli express these "doubts" about virginity and explore key conceptual language Rishonim developed based on this case. We will also pay attention to the high stakes consequences of how these sources approach women's bodies and sexual histories. Does carving out a realm of halakhic non-knowledge lead to greater bodily privacy and dignity, or is it a way to ignore cultural aspects of sexuality we'd rather not confront?

3:30 PM - 4:00 PM

Snack and Break

4:00 PM - 6:15 PM

Seder (Havruta Block)
“All My Doubts:” Rishonim and the Shulhan Arukh Negotiate Multiple Axes of Doubt

While s’feik s’feika originates in local discussions of specific cases, the Rishonim (early commentators on the Talmud) begin to expand the scope of the concept and apply it more broadly. This learning block will culminate with exploring the codification of s’feik s’feika in the Shulhan Arukh.

6:15 PM - 7:00 PM

Dinner

7:45 AM - 8:30 AM

Shaharit

8:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Breakfast

9:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Daily Orientation

9:15 AM - 12:45 PM

Seder
“Doubting Doubts” Applications of Sfek Sfeka
 (Shakh Part 1)

Shakh, a commentator on the Shulhan Arukh, chronicles and questions the expansion begun by the Rishonim in his Klalei Sfek Sfeka, which we will explore during two of our core learning sessions.

12:45 PM - 1:45 PM

Lunch

1:45 PM - 2:10 PM

Minhah

2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Shiur
“Doubting Doubts” Part I

3:30 PM - 4:00 PM

 Break

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Live Responsa Radio Recording

Hosted by R. Ethan Tucker and R. Avi Killip, Responsa Radio is a podcast in which you ask, and we answer questions about Jewish law in modern times. The answers are fascinating, relevant, and often surprising! Have a burning question? Share them with us for a chance to be featured on this live podcast episode!

7:45 AM - 8:30 AM

Shaharit

8:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Breakfast

9:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Daily Orientation

9:15 AM - 12:45 PM

Seder
“Doubting Doubts” The Shakh Doubts Sfek Sfeika
(Shakh part 2)

12:45 PM - 1:45 PM

Lunch

1:45 PM - 2:10 PM

Minhah

2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Shiur
“Doubting Doubts” Part II

3:30 PM - 4:00 PM

 Break
Optional Singing with R. Debora Sacks Mintz

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

Elective Sessions

Sfek Sfeka and Pregnancy: Centering Uncertainty in Pregnancy Loss
R. Aviva Richman
Pregnancy is the act of living with uncertainty. In pre-modern times, without ultrasounds and other technology, that uncertainty was all the more present. Pregnancies could last for months without knowing if a fetus was alive or dead, and without knowing any particulars about fetal development. We will do a close reading of an anecdote in the Talmud about pregnancy loss, and ask whether the language of S’feik S’feika in the subsequent analysis offers a container to hold realities of uncertainty, or perhaps too quickly turns the communal eye away from an experience that we tend to marginalize.

Redemptive Clarity: Rebbe Nahman of Breslav on the Nature of Doubt
Dena Weiss
In Likkutei Halakhot, Rebbe Nahman repeatedly returns to the role of Halakhah in navigating and eliminating doubt. In this class, we'll study some passages from this challenging and enigmatic work to open a conversation about the role and nature of doubt in our lives. When is doubt productive, and when is it limiting? Are we trying to live in a world without doubt? Is such a world possible?

5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Elective Sessions

Map of the Rishonim
R. Ethan Tucker
In this session, we will interactively construct a map of the most significant figures in medieval Talmudic interpretation and halakhic decision-making while filling in historical context. Bring a pen, paper, and a phone camera!

For Love of God—and Talmud
Dr. Jeremy Tabick
As someone who recently finished a Ph.D. in Talmud at JTS, I've been thinking about the ways in which academic approaches to our Rabbinic sources interact with my religious life. Come for a discussion of these themes, stay for the fanciful reconstructions of ancient texts regarding the kashrut of cheese—and learn the key ways (at least for me) in which Talmud differs from Physics

6:30 PM - 7:15 PM

Dinner

7:30 PM - 8:45 PM

Public Lecture
Attunement, not Submission: Embracing the Multivocality of Halakhah
R. Ethan Tucker
Halakhic works are often a dizzying compendium of multiple perspectives on a given issue, which can make it difficult to determine how to behave in a given situation. In this lecture, we will see that this is a feature rather than a bug. Critical values that are meant to guide our lives are rarely fully manifest in any given time, place, or situation. It is our job to discern the wisdom of each voice and allow that wisdom to make a claim on us as covenental partners, rather than submitting ourselves to one rigid path.

8:45 PM - 9:00 PM

Arvit

7:45 AM - 8:30 AM

Shaharit

8:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Breakfast

9:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Daily Orientation

9:15 AM - 12:45 PM

 Shiur Klali
Sfek Sfeka Lives On: R. Ovadiah and Contemporary Applications of Sfek Sfeka
R. Aviva Richman

Coming out of a strong and lengthy turn to severely limit the application of s’feik s’feika in the Sha"kh, we will explore how the halakhic concept lives on, especially in the p'sak of R. Ovadiah Yosef in modern times. Rather than approaching this as a battle over "lenient loopholes" we will strive to understand what is at stake in modern examples. The language of s’feik s’feika should help us name situations where multiple axes of doubt significantly shift the way we experience our own reality. When do we settle for, or even embrace, this lack of knowledge and its halakhic consequences? When do we need to strive for greater certainty?

 

12:45 PM - 1:45 PM

Lunch

1:45 PM - 2:10 PM

Minhah

2:15 PM - 3:45 PM

Concluding Program
Synthesis and Reflection

Rabbi Tali Adler

Rabbi Tali Adler

R. Tali Adler is faculty at Hadar. A musmekhet of Yeshivat Maharat and alumna of Stern College for Women, R. Adler has studied at a number of institutions including Hadar, Drisha, and Midreshet HaRova.
Rabbi Aviva Richman

Rabbi Aviva Richman

Rabbi Aviva Richman is Rosh Yeshiva at Hadar. She was ordained by R. Daniel Landes and has a doctorate from New York University in Talmud. R. Richman also studied in the Pardes Kollel and the Drisha Scholars’ Circle.

Dr. Jeremy Tabick

Dr. Jeremy Tabick is the Content Manager and faculty at Hadar, where he teaches, curates, and edits Hadar's content—both online and in print—and Project Zug courses. Jeremy received his PhD in Talmud at JTS. He graduated from the University of Manchester (in the UK) with a Masters in Physics, and is an alumnus of Yeshivat Hadar and the Conservative Yeshiva in Jerusalem. He lives in Riverdale with his wife and three children.

Rabbi Ethan Tucker

Rabbi Ethan Tucker

R. Ethan Tucker is President and Rosh Yeshiva at Hadar. He was ordained by the Chief Rabbinate of Israel and earned a doctorate in Talmud and Rabbinics from the Jewish Theological Seminary. A Wexner Graduate Fellow, he was a co-founder of Kehilat Hadar. He is the author, along with R. Micha’el Rosenberg, of Gender Equality and Prayer in Jewish Law (2017).
Rabbi Miriam-Simma Walfish

Rabbi Miriam-Simma Walfish

R. Miriam-Simma Walfish is faculty at Hadar and a Senior Coach for Pedagogy of Partnership. She holds a PhD in Rabbinics from Harvard University and has published several articles, including, "Upending the Curse of Eve: Reframing Maternal Breastfeeding in BT Ketubot" (2017).
Dena Weiss

Rabbi Dena Weiss

Rabbi Dena Weiss is Rosh Beit Midrash and Senior Faculty at Hadar, where she teaches Talmud, Midrash and Hasidut. Dena earned an MA in Theology from Harvard Divinity School. She has studied and taught in a variety of Jewish educational settings including Drisha, Midreshet Lindenbaum, and Pardes, and is a graduate of Yeshivat Maharat's Advanced Kollel.
Rabbi Avi Killip

Rabbi Avi Killip

Rabbi Avi Killip is Executive Vice President of Hadar. A graduate of Hebrew College Rabbinical School, R. Killip was a Wexner Graduate Fellow and a Schusterman Fellow. She is host of the Hadar podcasts Responsa Radio and Ta Shma.

This program is for experienced learners interested in immersing themselves in halakhic texts. Unlike many Hadar programs, this immersive program requires prior experience learning halakhic texts, and it will be tracked by level, from intermediate to advanced.

  • The advanced level is designed for those with fluency in Talmud and rishonim and who have extensive yeshiva background.
  • The intermediate level is designed for those who have spent time in a beit midrash and feel confident working through a sugya independently.

The brief application form includes a skills assessment to place participants in the appropriate level for their skills and background. Feel free to reach out if you have any questions.

The intensive will take place at Yeshivat Hadar - 210 W. 93rd St, New York, NY, 10025 - on May 19-23, 2024.

We’d love for you to bring a havruta! If that isn’t possible, we will match you with another participant who is looking for a havruta.

The general registration fee for this intensive is $650 (with an early bird rate of $550). If the fee poses an obstacle to participation, please feel free to make use of the reduced rate or email us at [email protected], and we will do our best to accommodate. All fees are fully refundable until two weeks (May 5, 2024) before the program.

Tuition includes access to the full range of programming, daily breakfast and lunch, and dinner when programming runs into the evening.

  • Early bird registration (valid before March 1, 2024): $550
  • General registration: $650
  • Scholarship rate: $400
  • Student rate: $300

This year’s Halakhah Intensive will only be offered in person. Stay tuned for opportunities to engage with similar topics and modalities online in the near future.

We’d love to tell you more about this program! Please reach out to [email protected] with any questions.

The Halakhah intensive features four core learning blocks devoted to unpacking the origins and development of the concept of s’feik s’feika. Over the course of the week, we will balance breadth and depth in our exploration of our core sources. As the week progresses, we will zoom out and consider the possibilities and pitfalls of applying the framework of s’feik s’feika to modern-day dilemmas. Each learning block will have at least 2.5h devoted to studying core sources with a havruta followed by a shiur. 

Seder and Shiur #1 “Now You See It, Now You Don’t”

We will begin our exploration of s’feik s’feika by looking at two cases in the Talmud in which a prohibited object is mixed with permitted objects. Debate over how to relate to this mixture of objects led to the development of the concept of s’feik s’feika. 

Seder and Shiur #2 “All My Doubts”

While s’feik s’feika originates in local discussions of specific cases, the Rishonim (early commentators on the Talmud) begin to expand the scope of the concept and apply it more broadly. This learning block will culminate with exploring the codification of s’feik s’feika in the Shulhan Arukh.

Seder and Shiur #3-#4 “Doubting Doubts”

Shakh, a commentator on the Shulhan Arukh, chronicles and questions the expansion begun by the Rishonim in his lengthy discussion regarding s’feik s’feika, which we will explore during two of our core learning sessions.

Overview

Hadar’s Halakhah Intensive features a week of rich, rigorous, and meaningful learning on a halakhic theme.

This program requires prior experience with learning halakhic texts, and it will be tracked by level, from intermediate to advanced. The brief application form includes a skills assessment to place participants in the appropriate level for their skills and background.

  • The advanced level is designed for those with fluency in Talmud and rishonim and who have extensive yeshiva background.
  • The intermediate level is designed for those who have spent time in a beit midrash and feel confident working through a sugya independently.

This year's theme is coming soon!

2024 Schedule

The schedule for 2025 is still in formation but you can explore last year's schedule below for an idea of the flow of the week:

5:30 PM - 5:45 PM

Arrive and Schmooze

5:45 PM - 7:00 PM

Welcome and Orientation
Minha

7:00 PM - 7:45 PM

Dinner

7:45 PM - 8:45 PM

Opening Lecture
“No Doubt About It:” Hazal’s approach to navigating uncertainty
R. Miriam-Simma Walfish
Doubt and uncertainty are a hallmark of the human condition. This lecture will frame our learning for the week by introducing key responses that the rabbis of the Mishnah and Talmud had to these common states. 

8:45 PM - 9:00 PM

Arvit

7:45 AM - 8:30 AM

Shaharit

8:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Breakfast

9:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Daily Orientation

9:15 AM - 12:45 PM

Seder and Shiur
Now you see it, now you don’t: Doubtful Objects in Hazal

We will begin our exploration of s’feik s’feika by looking at two cases in the Talmud in which a prohibited object is mixed with permitted objects. Debate over how to relate to this mixture of objects led to the development of the concept of s’feik s’feika

12:45 PM - 1:45 PM

Lunch

1:45 PM - 2:10 PM

Minhah

2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Shiur Klali
Confronting Gender in Core Paradigms of Safek
R. Aviva Richman

One of the paradigmatic cases in the classical canon of assessing S’feik S’feika relates to a groom's concern about a bride's virginity.  We will study how the Talmud Yerushalmi and Talmud Bavli express these "doubts" about virginity and explore key conceptual language Rishonim developed based on this case. We will also pay attention to the high stakes consequences of how these sources approach women's bodies and sexual histories. Does carving out a realm of halakhic non-knowledge lead to greater bodily privacy and dignity, or is it a way to ignore cultural aspects of sexuality we'd rather not confront?

3:30 PM - 4:00 PM

Snack and Break

4:00 PM - 6:15 PM

Seder (Havruta Block)
“All My Doubts:” Rishonim and the Shulhan Arukh Negotiate Multiple Axes of Doubt

While s’feik s’feika originates in local discussions of specific cases, the Rishonim (early commentators on the Talmud) begin to expand the scope of the concept and apply it more broadly. This learning block will culminate with exploring the codification of s’feik s’feika in the Shulhan Arukh.

6:15 PM - 7:00 PM

Dinner

7:45 AM - 8:30 AM

Shaharit

8:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Breakfast

9:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Daily Orientation

9:15 AM - 12:45 PM

Seder
“Doubting Doubts” Applications of Sfek Sfeka
 (Shakh Part 1)

Shakh, a commentator on the Shulhan Arukh, chronicles and questions the expansion begun by the Rishonim in his Klalei Sfek Sfeka, which we will explore during two of our core learning sessions.

12:45 PM - 1:45 PM

Lunch

1:45 PM - 2:10 PM

Minhah

2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Shiur
“Doubting Doubts” Part I

3:30 PM - 4:00 PM

 Break

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Live Responsa Radio Recording

Hosted by R. Ethan Tucker and R. Avi Killip, Responsa Radio is a podcast in which you ask, and we answer questions about Jewish law in modern times. The answers are fascinating, relevant, and often surprising! Have a burning question? Share them with us for a chance to be featured on this live podcast episode!

7:45 AM - 8:30 AM

Shaharit

8:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Breakfast

9:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Daily Orientation

9:15 AM - 12:45 PM

Seder
“Doubting Doubts” The Shakh Doubts Sfek Sfeika
(Shakh part 2)

12:45 PM - 1:45 PM

Lunch

1:45 PM - 2:10 PM

Minhah

2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Shiur
“Doubting Doubts” Part II

3:30 PM - 4:00 PM

 Break
Optional Singing with R. Debora Sacks Mintz

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

Elective Sessions

Sfek Sfeka and Pregnancy: Centering Uncertainty in Pregnancy Loss
R. Aviva Richman
Pregnancy is the act of living with uncertainty. In pre-modern times, without ultrasounds and other technology, that uncertainty was all the more present. Pregnancies could last for months without knowing if a fetus was alive or dead, and without knowing any particulars about fetal development. We will do a close reading of an anecdote in the Talmud about pregnancy loss, and ask whether the language of S’feik S’feika in the subsequent analysis offers a container to hold realities of uncertainty, or perhaps too quickly turns the communal eye away from an experience that we tend to marginalize.

Redemptive Clarity: Rebbe Nahman of Breslav on the Nature of Doubt
Dena Weiss
In Likkutei Halakhot, Rebbe Nahman repeatedly returns to the role of Halakhah in navigating and eliminating doubt. In this class, we'll study some passages from this challenging and enigmatic work to open a conversation about the role and nature of doubt in our lives. When is doubt productive, and when is it limiting? Are we trying to live in a world without doubt? Is such a world possible?

5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Elective Sessions

Map of the Rishonim
R. Ethan Tucker
In this session, we will interactively construct a map of the most significant figures in medieval Talmudic interpretation and halakhic decision-making while filling in historical context. Bring a pen, paper, and a phone camera!

For Love of God—and Talmud
Dr. Jeremy Tabick
As someone who recently finished a Ph.D. in Talmud at JTS, I've been thinking about the ways in which academic approaches to our Rabbinic sources interact with my religious life. Come for a discussion of these themes, stay for the fanciful reconstructions of ancient texts regarding the kashrut of cheese—and learn the key ways (at least for me) in which Talmud differs from Physics

6:30 PM - 7:15 PM

Dinner

7:30 PM - 8:45 PM

Public Lecture
Attunement, not Submission: Embracing the Multivocality of Halakhah
R. Ethan Tucker
Halakhic works are often a dizzying compendium of multiple perspectives on a given issue, which can make it difficult to determine how to behave in a given situation. In this lecture, we will see that this is a feature rather than a bug. Critical values that are meant to guide our lives are rarely fully manifest in any given time, place, or situation. It is our job to discern the wisdom of each voice and allow that wisdom to make a claim on us as covenental partners, rather than submitting ourselves to one rigid path.

8:45 PM - 9:00 PM

Arvit

7:45 AM - 8:30 AM

Shaharit

8:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Breakfast

9:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Daily Orientation

9:15 AM - 12:45 PM

 Shiur Klali
Sfek Sfeka Lives On: R. Ovadiah and Contemporary Applications of Sfek Sfeka
R. Aviva Richman

Coming out of a strong and lengthy turn to severely limit the application of s’feik s’feika in the Sha"kh, we will explore how the halakhic concept lives on, especially in the p'sak of R. Ovadiah Yosef in modern times. Rather than approaching this as a battle over "lenient loopholes" we will strive to understand what is at stake in modern examples. The language of s’feik s’feika should help us name situations where multiple axes of doubt significantly shift the way we experience our own reality. When do we settle for, or even embrace, this lack of knowledge and its halakhic consequences? When do we need to strive for greater certainty?

 

12:45 PM - 1:45 PM

Lunch

1:45 PM - 2:10 PM

Minhah

2:15 PM - 3:45 PM

Concluding Program
Synthesis and Reflection

Faculty

Rabbi Tali Adler

Rabbi Tali Adler

R. Tali Adler is faculty at Hadar. A musmekhet of Yeshivat Maharat and alumna of Stern College for Women, R. Adler has studied at a number of institutions including Hadar, Drisha, and Midreshet HaRova.
Rabbi Aviva Richman

Rabbi Aviva Richman

Rabbi Aviva Richman is Rosh Yeshiva at Hadar. She was ordained by R. Daniel Landes and has a doctorate from New York University in Talmud. R. Richman also studied in the Pardes Kollel and the Drisha Scholars’ Circle.

Dr. Jeremy Tabick

Dr. Jeremy Tabick is the Content Manager and faculty at Hadar, where he teaches, curates, and edits Hadar's content—both online and in print—and Project Zug courses. Jeremy received his PhD in Talmud at JTS. He graduated from the University of Manchester (in the UK) with a Masters in Physics, and is an alumnus of Yeshivat Hadar and the Conservative Yeshiva in Jerusalem. He lives in Riverdale with his wife and three children.

Rabbi Ethan Tucker

Rabbi Ethan Tucker

R. Ethan Tucker is President and Rosh Yeshiva at Hadar. He was ordained by the Chief Rabbinate of Israel and earned a doctorate in Talmud and Rabbinics from the Jewish Theological Seminary. A Wexner Graduate Fellow, he was a co-founder of Kehilat Hadar. He is the author, along with R. Micha’el Rosenberg, of Gender Equality and Prayer in Jewish Law (2017).
Rabbi Miriam-Simma Walfish

Rabbi Miriam-Simma Walfish

R. Miriam-Simma Walfish is faculty at Hadar and a Senior Coach for Pedagogy of Partnership. She holds a PhD in Rabbinics from Harvard University and has published several articles, including, "Upending the Curse of Eve: Reframing Maternal Breastfeeding in BT Ketubot" (2017).
Dena Weiss

Rabbi Dena Weiss

Rabbi Dena Weiss is Rosh Beit Midrash and Senior Faculty at Hadar, where she teaches Talmud, Midrash and Hasidut. Dena earned an MA in Theology from Harvard Divinity School. She has studied and taught in a variety of Jewish educational settings including Drisha, Midreshet Lindenbaum, and Pardes, and is a graduate of Yeshivat Maharat's Advanced Kollel.
Rabbi Avi Killip

Rabbi Avi Killip

Rabbi Avi Killip is Executive Vice President of Hadar. A graduate of Hebrew College Rabbinical School, R. Killip was a Wexner Graduate Fellow and a Schusterman Fellow. She is host of the Hadar podcasts Responsa Radio and Ta Shma.

FAQs

This program is for experienced learners interested in immersing themselves in halakhic texts. Unlike many Hadar programs, this immersive program requires prior experience learning halakhic texts, and it will be tracked by level, from intermediate to advanced.

  • The advanced level is designed for those with fluency in Talmud and rishonim and who have extensive yeshiva background.
  • The intermediate level is designed for those who have spent time in a beit midrash and feel confident working through a sugya independently.

The brief application form includes a skills assessment to place participants in the appropriate level for their skills and background. Feel free to reach out if you have any questions.

The intensive will take place at Yeshivat Hadar - 210 W. 93rd St, New York, NY, 10025 - on May 19-23, 2024.

We’d love for you to bring a havruta! If that isn’t possible, we will match you with another participant who is looking for a havruta.

The general registration fee for this intensive is $650 (with an early bird rate of $550). If the fee poses an obstacle to participation, please feel free to make use of the reduced rate or email us at [email protected], and we will do our best to accommodate. All fees are fully refundable until two weeks (May 5, 2024) before the program.

Tuition includes access to the full range of programming, daily breakfast and lunch, and dinner when programming runs into the evening.

  • Early bird registration (valid before March 1, 2024): $550
  • General registration: $650
  • Scholarship rate: $400
  • Student rate: $300

This year’s Halakhah Intensive will only be offered in person. Stay tuned for opportunities to engage with similar topics and modalities online in the near future.

We’d love to tell you more about this program! Please reach out to [email protected] with any questions.

Core Learning Blocks

The Halakhah intensive features four core learning blocks devoted to unpacking the origins and development of the concept of s’feik s’feika. Over the course of the week, we will balance breadth and depth in our exploration of our core sources. As the week progresses, we will zoom out and consider the possibilities and pitfalls of applying the framework of s’feik s’feika to modern-day dilemmas. Each learning block will have at least 2.5h devoted to studying core sources with a havruta followed by a shiur. 

Seder and Shiur #1 “Now You See It, Now You Don’t”

We will begin our exploration of s’feik s’feika by looking at two cases in the Talmud in which a prohibited object is mixed with permitted objects. Debate over how to relate to this mixture of objects led to the development of the concept of s’feik s’feika. 

Seder and Shiur #2 “All My Doubts”

While s’feik s’feika originates in local discussions of specific cases, the Rishonim (early commentators on the Talmud) begin to expand the scope of the concept and apply it more broadly. This learning block will culminate with exploring the codification of s’feik s’feika in the Shulhan Arukh.

Seder and Shiur #3-#4 “Doubting Doubts”

Shakh, a commentator on the Shulhan Arukh, chronicles and questions the expansion begun by the Rishonim in his lengthy discussion regarding s’feik s’feika, which we will explore during two of our core learning sessions.